by: Brittany Talissa King

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THE POWERFUL J.R.E. — After journalist Chris Wallace failed to control the first presidential debate, millions of Americans went to Twitter. They nominated Joe Rogan for consideration to moderate Trump and Biden, but that never happened. Instead, yesterday, he hosted an highly-anticipated experience with another candidate running for president, rapper Kanye West.

Nearly one-hundred-days after West’s #2020Vision appearance in Charleston, a presidential rally turned “chaotic breakdown,” according to the news — the Chicagoan made another presidential appearance on the successful Joe Rogan Experience podcast garnering over 3.5 million views in less than 24 hours.

During this three hour conversation, West seemed relaxed and at-home inside Rogan’s studio. In a lavender hoodie and Rogan in his usual casual uniform, West sat face-to-face, seemingly six-feet-apart, ready to venture inside this long-sought conversation. Of course, the iconic rapper talked about his “genius” and promoted his many talents within the fashion industry, music production — even farming, house design, and hopefully becoming president in 2024. …


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America has been through a series of unfortunate events. And now, we have to elect a new president. When will the madness end.

WASHINGTON D.C. — There are less than two months until Election Day — and millions of Americans are awaiting the first presidential debate on September 29th. …


by: Brittany Talissa King

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We’re twenty weeks into the COVID-19 pandemic and 75 days post-George Floyd. The street-marches for justice have not ceased, but the actions to eradicate racial inequality have popularized through conversations assembled on virtual platforms and social media, making this current discourse a novel marker in American history. …


by Brittany Talissa King

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It was 1998 when I saw her on my Panasonic T.V.

I had just returned home from school and stationed myself in front of the family computer. …


A young musician in New York grapples with his success within a black genre.

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HARLEM, NEW YORK — It’s Saturday in August, and it’s hot. Tony Glausi is wearing a funky floral button-up performing with his four-piece jazz band at Home Sweet Harlem. “Thank you for coming out, everyone. I’m Tony,” he said. He motions his hand back, giving attention to his band-mates before picking up his brass trumpet. The entire band is different hues of brown.

Tony is a tan shade of white, with hair styled like Elvis Presley. “Anybody else wants to come up and play?” Tony opens the performance to the entire crowd. …


We cannot dismantle race, but perhaps there’s another way to escape it.

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For the last decade, many Americans have steadily fought the structure of race to achieve a united-country and post-racial state — some opting for colorblindness, and others challenging the historical bias attached to skin color. Even right now, as we’re surviving a novel pandemic, the racial one is met with more urgency. But to find a cure, we must analyze the problem. So, let’s rewind four centuries to the genesis of race.

Historians say racial categories weren’t officially established until 1790. After the European Spaniards stole West Africans and native lands, other groups migrated over the Atlantic to America. Once the Dutch, the British, and the French arrived — the Spaniards recognized in order to keep their dominion, they needed a structure to uphold their power. So, they considered constructing a hierarchy based on ethnicity. But there was one huge problem; the foreigners’ skin was identical to theirs. And because of that, each group could homogenize with “Spaniard” to acquire control. Not only that, but another pigment was also in question. There were also brown Dutch people, brown French people, and brown Spaniards. Even their slaves were “brown” — and after recognizing these “color loop-holes,” they understood ignoring them could inadvertently dismantle their entire supremacy. …


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In 1999, like most baby millennials, our parents dictated the family television.

In my Midwestern home, I woke up to Katie Couric and Matt Lauer’s news reports on Today before school. After I returned home, the ritual continued. As mom prepared dinner, usually a meatloaf, buttery mashed potatoes, and a side of green beans- I’d see dad watching Pat Sajak on the Wheel of Fortune while Vanna White turned random letters in a glittery dress. Johnny Gilbert would introduce the iconic “Alex Trebek!” and then there was Regis Philbin’s rhetorical question: “Who Wants To Be A Millionaire?”

And to avoid hearing the arbitrary sentence “go do your homework,” I’d hurry the telephone gossip with Taryn, feed my Tamagotchis, then grab my Lisa Frank folders and spread school over the floor, like Couric’s notes on her morning desk. …


by Brittany Talissa King

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Photo Courtesy of Black Kudos

On August 24, 1955, 14-year-old Emmett Till was falsely accused of “flirtatiously whistling” at Carolyn Bryant; a 21-year old white woman in Mississippi. Four days later, his beaten and mutilated body was found floating in the Tallahatchie River. Emmett Till became an iconic symbol for the Civil Rights Movement and contemporary movements like #BlackLivesMatter. This horrific murder still reminds America of its racial violence toward black bodies — and why modern murders like George Floyd reveals the “nation’s heritage.”

Emmett Louis Till, also known as “Bobo,” was born on July 25, 1941, in Chicago, Illinois. He was the only child to his mother, Mamie Till. She worked 12-hour shifts as a clerk for the Air Force where she managed “secret and confidential” files. …


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SOUTH CAROLINA — He jumped on stage with a bullet-proof vest, and “2020” etched in his purple hair. The Chicagoan rapper, and third hopeful for president, Kanye Omari West.

Kanye held his #2020Vision rally last night in North Charleston — his first presidential campaign appearance. Like Donald Trump, he rambled about being a billionaire, and how Democrats are corrupt. He made promises he could never keep, like a pro-life “policy” — guaranteeing expecting women “a million dollars” if they choose against abortion. And similar to the current president, he sparred with opposers, and had one escorted out by security.

This took place on Sunday, much like his church services. However, not to speak for God as Ye did, but I have a gut-feeling that He was not pleased. …


By: Brittany Talissa King

The current state of America is one for the history books.

It’s the 4th of July,

Mitt Romney has marched with black liberationists, the NFL has apologized for opposing racial protests, and NASCAR has banned the Confederate flag from their franchise. But bigger things have occurred; over 25 million Americans have crowded the streets in protest against white supremacy, from California to the New York islands. And the chants have traveled across the Atlantic where the United Kingdom, Italy, Spain, Belgium, Denmark, and Hungary have unabashedly stood in solidarity with Black Lives Matter.

This is not a work of fiction; all of these events are true. But I’m unsure if this sudden revelation of black oppression will last. Deep-down, I hope this becomes the chapter when white supremacy is jettisoned from Earth. Though I’m afraid, this might be another moment that America fails to seize, and will only be remembered when another black body is suffocated. …

About

Brittany Talissa King

Freelance writer. MA in Journalism from NYU. Studied under Ta-Nehisi Coates in his “Writing for Reporters” course. My weapon is My pen. @b.talissa on IG.

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